21October2021

The cart is empty
Subsribe Now to our Weekly Newsletter

HortiTrends is NOW Horticulture Connected

hc-newsite3

Today's News

Today's News

Featured News

Featured News
Impact of the Decision To Leave the EU

Impact of the Decision To Leave the EU

It is now clear that the British people have made the choice to leave the European Union. The countr...


Readmore

Horticulture in the Dail - Allotments Provision: Written Answers

Derek Keating (Dublin Mid West, Fine Gael)
32. To ask the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine his plans to support urban agriculture such as the promotion and funding to allotments; if he considers it necessary to introduce registration of those who make available property to be developed into allotments in urban areas; and if he will make a statement on the matter.

Derek Keating (Dublin Mid West, Fine Gael)
66. To ask the Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine his plans to develop an urban programme in conjunction with the Department of the Environment, Community and Local Government and the Department of Education and Skills to develop allotments, the registration of allotments, the standards that allotments should adhere to when a contract is provided; his views on same; and if he will make a statement on the matter.

Simon Coveney (Minister, Department of Agriculture, the Marine and Food; Cork South Central, Fine Gael)
I propose to take Questions Nos. 32 and 66 together. As Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, I have no function with regard to allotments.
The Acquisition of Land (Allotments) Act 1926, which falls under the remit of the Minister for Environment, Community and Local Government, enables local authorities to let allotments in urban areas to an individual for the specific purpose of cultivating vegetables mainly for consumption by that individual “or his family”, if the authority is satisfied that such a demand exists.

Bord Bia, the state body under my aegis charged with the promotion of horticulture, promotes gardening and amenity horticulture through the Bloom festival in the Phoenix Park which took place over the June Bank Holiday weekend.

This highly popular consumer event educates on the many aspects of gardening. Bloom 2013 attracted a record 110,000 visitors including a significant number from urban areas. One of its main attractions was the showcasing of 28 show gardens from the very best of Irish landscape gardeners and designers, ranging from large, medium, small gardens and concept gardens in an assortment of design styles and budget points. For the first time this year, Bloom hosted a number of specific small gardens (“post card gardens”) which were designed, prepared and constructed by community gardeners and gardening clubs to demonstrate their abilities and to inspire other non-professional gardeners to experience the joys and benefits of gardening.

In addition, a comprehensive range of information and advice on a range of gardening topics was dispensed from the numerous talks by leading experts on the Garden Expert Stage over the five days of the show. Also present at Bloom were a number of organisations who provided instruction and advice on preparing a garden and “growing your own” vegetables and fruit.

The “Best in Season” fresh fruit and vegetables produce market displayed and retailed top quality locally grown fruit, vegetables and potatoes. Bloom allows visitors to engage with local Irish producers and pick up some tips on how to cook and use the best tasting fresh produce available throughout the Irish fruit, vegetable and potato season. Bloom is now an important date in the calendar of many gardeners and horticulture enthusiasts.

Source: HortiTrends News Room